Recasting History: Are Race, Class, and Gender Dominating American History?


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Recasting History: Are Race, Class, and Gender Dominating American History?

Jan 10, 2013 | 

Ashley Thorne, Peter Wood, Richard W. Fonte



In 1971, the state of Texas enacted a legislative requirement that students at public institutions complete two courses in American history. With that mandate in mind, the Texas Association of Scholars and the National Association of Scholars proposed to determine how students today meet the requirement, and what history departments offer as a means of doing so. What courses can students take, and what vision of U.S. history do those courses present? This study is the result of our investigation.

Download the PDF: Recasting History: Are Race, Class, and Gender Dominating American History?

*Note, 3/8/13: This report cites a law passed in 1971 "that requires all students at public higher education institutions to complete two courses in American history." According to "Some Background on Texas' U.S. History Requirement," published by the Austin American-Statesman on March 5, 2013, the law was in fact passed in 1955 and codified into the Education Code in 1971. The text of the law is included in Appendix 2 of the report, and the report has been amended to reflect the 1955 origin of the law.

PAL

| January 02, 2013 - 2:59 PM"


THE REPORT IS FASCINATING AND IMPORTANT BUT THE QUESTION IS WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT OTHER THAN READING AND DISSEMINATING. PERHAPS WE SHOULD BE EXPLORING ALTERNATIVES TO THESE COURSES ON LINE. IT IS NOT THE BEST BUT MAY BE THE ONLY VIABLE SOLUTION.

American

| January 15, 2013 - 12:12 PM"


Taking genuine history and revising it into a fantasy history to conform with social engineering and liberal ideology is dishonest. But they do it anyways.

George Zilbergeld

| January 22, 2013 - 10:37 AM"


Take a look at today’s NYT article “At Sranford,Clinical Training For Defense of Religious Liberty”(January 22, 2013, page A16) on the setting up of a law clinic that will work to protect religious liberty in America. Some folks are startled and annoyed that this side should even be represented at Stanford.
Sincerely,

George Zilbergeld

Jacqueline

| February 04, 2013 - 6:43 PM"


I guess we should all go back to Channing’s A History of the United States (1905-1925) for the “real” US History.  This is such a ridiculous notion. In the words of DuBois; “He who ignores or seeks to override the race idea in human, ignores and overrides the central thought of history.”  It is really that old argument about objectivity.  Some scholars, especially historians still labor under this idea that somehow one version of history is more legitimate than others.  This is simply not the case.  Unfortunately, the reactionaries have sounded the alarm and the backlash is in full readiness. The fact is that there is no history that exists without a narrative.  A narrative includes a specific perspective.  Objectivity divorced from a perspective is not possible for us humans.  I guess we will have to go back to the future.

Joseph

| February 06, 2013 - 11:42 AM"


A delusional or self-centered person has perspective, even if that perspective is skewed from reality at best or even dishonestly manipulative at worst.  Let’s not dismiss this reseach with a sophistic argument that avoids considering a possibly truthful (and challenging to conventional thinking) study outcome.

Student

| April 07, 2013 - 4:25 AM"


I made a list of the major divisions and important events in US History, such as one might expect to find in a comprehensive textbook or syllabus. Please tell me which of these do not deal with race, class or gender.
Pre-Columbian America
American Colonization
French & Indian War
American Revolution
The Constitution and Bill of Rights
The Slave Trade
The Louisiana Purchase
The War of 1812
Indian Resettlement/Trail of Tears
The Mexican-American War
Western Expansion (Gold Rush/Oregon Trail/Manifest Destiny)
Build up to the Civil War (slave uprisings, abolitionism, MO Compromise)
Civil War
Reconstruction
Indian Wars
Spanish-American War
Progressive Movement
World War I
The Great Depression
World War II
The Cold War
The Korean War
The Civil Rights Movement
The Vietnam War
The Gulf War
The Iraq & Afghanistan Wars/Occupation

Semantically Inaccurate

| April 07, 2013 - 5:02 PM"


Both the current law and the proposed bill are concerning “American” history, not “United States” history. US History only makes up 1-3% of American History, depending on what date is used for Paleo-Indian migration to the Americas. Your study fails to examine the overemphasis placed on US history in American History courses.
This semantic confusion draws attention to a significant methodological flaw in this study. You have analyzed two universities teaching American History with the expectation that they should be teaching US History. You have not studied any universities trying to fulfill a state dictated US History requirement. The purpose of performing scholarly studies is to test hypotheses, not to use only the data and definitions that support a specific hypothesis.