In 2011, Inside Academia conducted 41 video interviews with higher education experts. We have archived the episodes here. Many of the interviews are of NAS staff, members, and board members. For more information about Inside Academia, scroll down to "About the Program."

Episodes & Guests

#1 – Marty Nemko – The Bachelor’s Degree as America’s ‘Most Overrated Product’ (1/3/11)

#2 – Kevin D. Williamson – ‘More Spending for Less Output’ in Public Education (1/10/11)

#3 – Greg Lukianoff – Hello Campus, Goodbye Freedom of Speech (1/17/11)

#4 – Katherine Mangu-Ward – The Demand-Debt Link, or How to Burst the Bubble (1/24/11)

#5 – Michael Oriard – College Athletics & the Myth of Amateurism (1/31/11)

#6 – Ben Novak – The Glory Days of the Fraternity System (2/7/11)

#7 – Peter Wood – The Radicalization of the College Campus (2/14/11)

#8 – Jason Fertig – The New Normal: Yesterday’s ‘F’ as the ‘C’ of Today (2/21/11)

#9 – David French – The False Advertising of Free Thought on Campus (2/28/11)

#10 – Mark Bauerlein – The Adolescent Instinct & ‘The Dumbest Generation’ (3/7/11)

#11 – Robert Weissberg – America’s Problem is ‘Bad Students, Not Bad Schools’ (3/14/11)

#12 – Anne Neal – The Lazy University & Cultural Abdication (3/21/11)

#13 – Charles Mitchell – The False Choice of More Public Money vs. Higher Tuition (3/28/11)

#14 – Richard Vedder – The Great College Degree Scam (4/4/11)

#15 – Christian Brady – The Research University, Core Curriculum, & New Media (4/11/11)

#16 – Terry Anderson – Sustainability and Free Market Environmentalism (4/18/11)

#17 – Ashley Thorne – Sustainability as Staff and Rod for the New Elite (4/25/11)

#18 – George Leef – Higher Education as Oversold and Underperforming (5/2/11)

#19 – Tom Bethell – The Orthodoxies of Government Science (5/9/11)

#20 – Ben Novak – The Impotency of Student Government (5/16/11)

#21 – Jane Shaw – Why Do ‘Great Books’ Matter? (5/23/11)

#22 – Christopher Long – The Future of ‘Educating for Liberty’ (5/30/11)

#23 – Paul Gottfried – The Multicultural Fixation (6/6/11)

#24 – Robert Weissberg – The Mechanics of Affirmative Action (6/13/11)

#25 – Andy Nash – The First Six Months Behind the Ivory Curtain (6/20/11)

#26 – Ed Whelan – The Triumph of Judicial Conservatism (6/27/11)

#27 – George H. Nash – America’s Founding Generation (7/4/11)

#28 – R.V. Young – Sex and Freshman Composition (or: Why You Can’t Think) (7/11/11)

#29 – Mark Bauerlein – American History by Google and Wikipedia (7/18/11)

#30 – J. Budziszewski – A Primer on Natural Law (7/25/11)

#31 – John Zmirak – How to Choose the Right College (8/1/11)

#32 – Malcolm Kline – Accuracy in Academia (8/8/11)

#33 – Naomi Riley – Colleges Are in the Prestige (Not Teaching) Business (8/22/11)

#34 – Andrew Ferguson – Crazy U: The Circus that is College Admissions (8/29/11)

#35 – Richard Shavelson – How to Rate the Quality of an Education (9/5/11)

#36 – Ben Novak – On Trusteeship and Shared Governance (9/12/11)

#37 – Richard Redding – On The Politically Correct University (9/19/11)

#38 – Jim Wolfston – Is Higher Ed Worth the Money? (9/26/11)

#39 – Evan Maloney – How Colleges Try to ‘Indoctrinate U’ (10/03/11)

#40 – Trevor Gast – On Student Loan Debt Forgiveness (11/02/11)

#41 – Neal McCluskey – How Student Loans Drive up Tuition (12/12/11)

 

About the Program

Today, perhaps more than ever, institutions of higher education are responsible for both driving the engines of a knowledge-based economy and determining the character of a culture steeped in instant, global communication.

From innovations in design and thought generated in labs and colloquia to in-class preparation for America’s next generation of standard bearers, our approach to learning at its highest levels profoundly impacts the lives of every citizen.

More money is spent on education than almost any other single activity in the United States. Rising tuition costs pinch more each year from family savings and the public coffers. College students and their families incur increasingly heavier debt loads in pursuit of undergraduate education, all with only the vaguest sense that increasing enrollment, falling standards, and changing priorities at many institutions may be rendering their investments less and less worthwhile.

All of this suggests that there should be a vibrant and diverse national dialog about the many complex issues facing American higher ed in the 21st century.  On the contrary, from the Opinion pages of national newspapers to college campuses themselves, there exists a vacuum of discussion on these topics, with virtually no discourse aimed at engaging the uninitiated.

Inside Academia challenges this sorry state of affairs with the hope of sparking thoughtful conversations that will be critical to examination and reform of higher education. Each episode offers thought-provoking insight from key opinion leaders who are bucking the status quo and shaping the national discussion of the modern academy.

From the politics of controversial curricula and campus speech codes to the economics of rising tuition and budgetary waste, each edition of Inside Academia fearlessly offers a revealing peek behind the Ivory Curtain.