Center for College Affordability and Productivity

Why They Seem to Rise Together: Federal Aid and College Tuition

Feb 21, 2012 by George Leef, Hans Bader, Herbert London, Peter Wood, Richard Vedder |

Peter Wood, Richard Vedder, George Leef, Hans Bader, and Herbert London weigh in on the Center for College Affordability and Productivity's new study on whether colleges raise tuition when they receive federal aid.

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Bennett, Biden, and Boondoggles

Feb 20, 2012 by Richard Vedder |

The vice president appears to be the latest to agree that federal student-aid programs are contributing to rising college costs, writes Richard Vedder.

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We’re Overdoing It on Faculty Research

Nov 30, 2011 by George Leef |

So argues English professor Mark Bauerlein in a new study published by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. In today’s Pope Center Clarion Call, I comment on the study.

Bauerlein finds… Continue Reading | Leave a Comment >

Video: The Federal Takeover of Higher Education

May 12, 2011 by |

Peter Wood spoke about the effects of federal direct lending on rising generations and higher education at a panel with the Family Research Council.

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Video: Richard Vedder on the “Nearly-Everyone-Should-Go-to-College” Idea

Apr 05, 2011 by |

Richard Vedder, president of the CCAP, interviewed with Inside Academia this week on the economics of college education and on why tuition costs have gotten to be so high.

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Rich Vedder on Academically Adrift

Feb 01, 2011 by George Leef |

Rich Vedder has an essay today on Minding the Campus in which he discusses the “sniping” at that most inconvenient book (inconvenient for the higher education establishment, anyway) Academically Adrift. His… Continue Reading | Leave a Comment >

“Mindless” Pursuit of College Degrees Comes at a High Cost

Dec 13, 2010 by Ashley Thorne, Richard Vedder |

Approximately 60 percent of the increase in the number of college graduates from 1992 to 2008 worked in jobs that the Bureau of Labor Statistics considers relatively low skilled.

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