Dicta

The home of “things said” by the National Association of Scholars.

Why They Seem to Rise Together: Federal Aid and College Tuition

Peter Wood

Peter Wood, Richard Vedder, George Leef, Hans Bader, and Herbert London weigh in on the Center for College Affordability and Productivity's new study on whether colleges raise tuition when they receive federal aid.

Bennett, Biden, and Boondoggles

Richard Vedder

The vice president appears to be the latest to agree that federal student-aid programs are contributing to rising college costs, writes Richard Vedder.

We're Overdoing It on Faculty Research

George Leef

So argues English professor Mark Bauerlein in a new study published by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. In today’s Pope Center Clarion Call, I comment on the study.

Bauerlein finds that more colleges and universities have jumped on the research bandwagon over the last several decades and also that the volume of published research that is necessary for tenure has been rising. All that outpouring of scholarly work, however, is of little benefit (at least in the field of literary criticism, which is the subject of Bauerlein’s investigation; I suspect we would find the same thing in many other disciplines) since books and articles are so rarely read or even cited. The costs, however, are substantial — the explicit cost of paying professors about a third of their salary to do that work, and the implicit cost of diverting time and effort away from other educational efforts that would be of more use to students.

Video: The Federal Takeover of Higher Education

Peter Wood spoke about the effects of federal direct lending on rising generations and higher education at a panel with the Family Research Council.

Video: Richard Vedder on the "Nearly-Everyone-Should-Go-to-College" Idea

Richard Vedder, president of the CCAP, interviewed with Inside Academia this week on the economics of college education and on why tuition costs have gotten to be so high.

Rich Vedder on Academically Adrift

George Leef

Rich Vedder has an essay today on Minding the Campus in which he discusses the “sniping” at that most inconvenient book (inconvenient for the higher education establishment, anyway) Academically Adrift. His argument is that the book’s main thesis is correct: 

"Mindless" Pursuit of College Degrees Comes at a High Cost

Ashley Thorne

Approximately 60 percent of the increase in the number of college graduates from 1992 to 2008 worked in jobs that the Bureau of Labor Statistics considers relatively low skilled.