Video: 1820

The Missouri Compromise and its Legacy

National Association of Scholars

In 1820, under the Missouri Compromise, Missouri was admitted as a slave state in exchange for legislation that prohibited slavery in the United States above the 36°30′ parallel. For many decades, the Missouri Compromise was hailed as essential, and many historians believe it helped postpone the Civil War. Despite its importance in excluding slavery from some U.S. territories, the Missouri Compromise was bitterly disappointing to opponents of slavery and it further legitimized the institution of slavery in the South.

What is the legacy of the Missouri Compromise today? Was it a stark success? A necessary evil?

This webinar features John Craig Hammond, associate professor of history at Penn State University, New Kensington; Jeffrey Pasley, professor and associate director, Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, University of Michigan; and Paul Finkelman, president of Gratz College. The discussion was moderated by David Randall, NAS director of research. 

View and register for our upcoming webinars on American history and literature here.


Image: Reynold's Political Map of the United States, Encyclopedia Britannica.

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