1776 v. 1619: Two Visions of American History

National Association of Scholars

Update: This event is now sold out, as Zoom's participant capacity has been filled. However, if you would still like to view the webinar, please use this link to watch on YouTube Live.


This year, the 244th since America's independence, has seen numerous figures across the political and cultural landscape call for reflection on America's so-called "original sin"—slavery. While we ought to be mindful of that terrible history, being truly mindful of it requires a commitment to accuracy and understanding of context. We are unfortunately in a moment when wildly inaccurate and de-contextualized claims about slavery are widespread.

The 1619 Project from the New York Times and founder Nikole Hannah-Jones is one such instance. This project presents a historical re-telling of the American story, one that places slavery as the essential element. 1619 makes the case for a history rooted solely in the idea that America is a racist nation, founded on racist ideals, and propped up by racist institutions and individuals.

Join the National Association of Scholars Thursday, August 27 at 2 pm Eastern Time as we convene a panel to discuss how the 1619 Project misrepresents American history, and what a thoughtful, historically-grounded alternative looks like?

1776 v. 1619: Two Visions of American History
Thursday, August 27th, 2 pm Eastern Time


Update: This event is now sold out, as Zoom's participant capacity has been filled. However, if you would still like to view the webinar, please use this link to watch on YouTube Live.

Panelists

This virtual event will feature Dr. Robert Woodson, Founder and President of the Woodson Center and Dr. Wilfred McClay, Professor and G.T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty at the University of Oklahoma. The discussion will be moderated by David Randall, Director of Research for the National Association of Scholars.

Robert Woodson
Founder and President,
Woodson Center

Wilfred McClay
Professor and G.T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty,
University of Oklahoma

Photo by Brandon Mowinkel on Unsplash, Edited.

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