EVENT: Freedom to Learn

A Blueprint for Higher Education Reform

National Association of Scholars

Freedom to Learn
A Blueprint for Higher Education Reform

January 13th at 3 pm ET

Via Zoom

Since 2017 the National Association of Scholars has published two policy guidance documents, each named "Freedom to Learn." To begin 2021, NAS is publishing additional recommendations, updated for the reforms and adjustments in higher education over the last two years.

Freedom to Learn 2021 includes new reforms, specifically addressing pandemic related stresses on the academy with a focus on student loans and government subsidies. The policy proposal attempts to remedy foreign influence in American higher education by continuing to advocate for the closure of all Confucius Institutes and enforcement of foreign gift disclosure regulations. The document also includes reforms to promote free speech, intellectual diversity, and accreditation reform.

Which reforms should the incoming Biden administration focus on and why?

Join the National Association of Scholars for an afternoon discussion this Wednesday, January 13th at 3 pm ET, to discover all the ways we can make higher education work for the public good.

Order of Events

Reforming Higher Education's Culture

3:00 pm ET—Lecture—Teresa Manning, Policy Director, National Association of Scholars

3:30 pm ET—Panel Discussion

  • Jonathan Pidluzny, Vice President of Academic Affairs, American Council of Trustees and Alumni
  • Dennis Hayes, Director, Academics for Academic Freedom (UK)
  • Mary Clare Amselem, Policy Analyst, Center for Education Policy, Heritage Foundation

Higher Ed's Financial Troubles: Causes, Consequences, and Solutions

4:25 pm ET—Lecture—Peter W. Wood, President, National Association of Scholars

4:55 pm ET—Panel Discussion

  • Richard Vedder, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Ohio University
  • Jenna Robinson, President, The James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal
  • Neetu Arnold, Research Associate, National Association of Scholars

Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash

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