Register for Academic Freedom in the Age of Political Correctness

National Association of Scholars

Please join us for a panel discussion featuring Jay Schalin, Peter Wood, and KC Johnson, with moderator Mark Bauerlein.

The last academic year saw waves of student protests, disinvitations of campus speakers, and calls for trigger warnings and safe spaces. University administrators tasked with enforcing order and upholding intellectual freedom often found themselves unprepared—or else caved to student demands. What does academic freedom mean in this age of political correctness? Join us as we discuss the status of academic freedom today and how to rebuild its foundations.

When
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 
Reception at 6:00 p.m., Talk at 6:30 p.m.

Where 
 First Things Editorial Offices 
35 East 21st St., Sixth Floor 
New York, NY 10010

RSVP Here
 

Jay Schalin joined the Pope Center in August 2007. A Philadelphia native, he began his writing career as a freelance journalist for the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey and wrote for several other papers in New Jersey and Delaware. His articles have appeared in Forbes, the Washington Times, Fox News Online, U.S. News and World Report, Investor’s Business Daily, Human Events, and American Thinker. His op-eds have been published by the McClatchy News Service and Raleigh’s News & Observer. He has been interviewed on ESPN, NPR, and UNC-TV, and his work has been featured on ABC News and Fox News’ The O’Reilly Factor. Read Jay Schalin’s new report Academic Freedom in the Age of Political Correctness online here.

Peter Wood is an anthropologist and former provost. He was appointed president of the NAS in 2009 after serving as NAS’s executive director for two years. Previously, he was provost of The King’s College in New York City (2005-2007), and, earlier, a tenured member of the Anthropology Department at Boston University. Dr. Wood is the author of A Bee in the Mouth: Anger in America Now and of Diversity:The Invention of a Concept. In addition to his scholarly work, Dr. Wood has published several hundred articles in print and online journals, such as Partisan Review and National Review Online, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. Read Peter Wood’s statement The Architecture of Intellectual Freedom on the NAS website here.

KC Johnson is professor of history at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate Center. Johnson taught at Arizona State University and Williams College and served as visiting professor at Harvard and Tel Aviv University, as Fulbright Distinguished Chair in the Humanities. Johnson has written and edited numerous books about American history. He wrote a blog, and co-wrote, with Stuart Taylor, Until Proven Innocent: Political Correctness and the Shameful Injustice of the Duke Lacrosse Rape Case. He and Taylor are currently finishing a book on due process and campus sexual assault.

Mark Bauerlein is Professor of English at Emory University and Senior Editor at First Things. His books include Literary Criticism: An Autopsy (1997), The Pragmatic Mind: Explorations in the Psychology of Belief (1997), and The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (2008). His essays have appeared in PMLA, Partisan Review, Wilson Quarterly, Yale Review, Commentary, and New Criterion, and his commentaries and reviews in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Weekly Standard, The Guardian, and Chronicle of Higher Education.

This event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP here.

Image: Brick Laying by Scott Lewis // CC BY

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