Collegiate Press Roundup 5-13-10

Glenn Ricketts

We present our regular sampling of student journalists and editors, as they address various and sundry topics in their campus newspapers. This week’s entries include the ongoing controversy over Arizona’s new immigration law, the dark side of sophisticated communications technologies, the National Day of Prayer, Washington, D.C.’s proposed soda tax, and how to dress on your summer vacation. 

  1. In the Williams College Record, a guest editorialist denounces Arizona’s recently enacted immigration law as unconstitutional, immoral and an affront to the ideals of the college. 
  2. By contrast, an opponent of the Arizona law writing in UC/Berkeley’s Daily Californian asks everyone to please cool it and tone down the hyperbolic rhetoric: supporters of the measure aren’t necessarily racists. 
  3. A regular writer for the Daily Mississippian offers a view of the recent Congressional inquiries into Wall Street and the Goldman-Sachs investment firm. 
  4. Although technology in the Information Age has given us dazzling new realities, an op-ed in The Review at the University of Delaware cites the growing and largely unnoticed perils to personal privacy that are also part of the package. 
  5. Writing in The Daily Pennsylvanian, one U of P journalist salutes the achievements of retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens and laments his departure. 
  6. The editors of The New Hampshire at UNH find the Obama administration’s support for a National Day of Prayer puzzling, since it’s a carryover from the Bush administration and also unconstitutional. 
  7. At the University of Chicago, the editors of The Maroon try to allay growing fears that the U of C’s unique academic culture is threatened by recent changes in admissions policy. 
  8. As summer vacation approaches, an op-ed writer in the Daily Kansan offers advice for those vexed by sartorial uncertainties. 
  9. A writer in the Tulane Hullabaloo offers some suggestions on how to impress prospective new students, and offset the university’s image as a “party school.” 
  10. A regular columnist for The Middlebury Campus takes a look at the “diversity” with which the academy is so preoccupied, and argues that it doesn’t seem to include a diversity of ideas on most campuses. 
  11. A Connecticut College senior doesn’t like the undeserved privileges given to the school’s star athletes one little bit, as he explains in The College Voice. 
  12. Writing in George Washington University’s The GW Hatchet, one staffer disputes that taxing soft drinks will make soda addicts healthier. 
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