Indiana Teachers Union Opposing Sensible Reform

Jason Fertig

The Indiana State Board of Education is proposing a teaching license that would allow college graduates with good grades and work experience to become classroom teachers.  According to the Board:

“Candidates would need to hold a bachelor’s degree with a B-average in the content area they want to teach, pass a content test and have work experience in the subject they want to teach. The teacher also would need to begin training on instructional methods by the first month they enter a classroom.”

Imagine that – teachers who know their subjects as opposed to pedagogical fads.  Sounds great, unless you are in the Indiana State Teachers Association.  Members feel that the new license “cheapens the profession”:

“To allow someone to simply pass a test and demonstrate knowledge of a particular content area in no way qualifies them to be teaching children in a classroom.”

I can think of numerous punch lines here.  How about – given the proliferation of high stakes testing in K-12 education, having considerable skill in passing tests is the perfect preparation for modern teachers.

Insert more punch lines below if you like.

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