Georgia NAS Chapter Sponsors Lecture on "Tenured Radicals"

Ashley Thorne

The following event announcement is from the Georgia chapter of the National Association of Scholars. We encourage NAS members, supporters, and friends in the Decatur, Georgia area to attend.

Weather Underground in the Ivory Tower:
Transforming Education from Kindergarten to College 

A lecture by Mary Grabar and Tina Trent 

Sunday, November 3, 2013, 2:00 p.m. -- Refreshments Follow Lecture
The Solarium, 321 W. Hill Street, Decatur, GA 30030 (Oakhurst Neighborhood) 

Mary Grabar and Tina Trent, both Ph.D.’s and former college instructors, will describe the influence of “tenured radicals” on disciplines including teacher-training and women’s studies.  Former Weather Underground and Black Panther terrorists who once bombed police stations and robbed banks now advance their radical agendas in higher education, where they are treated as celebrities and showered with prestigious academic honors.    

Mary Grabar will describe how Weatherman Bill Ayers’ radical ideas about education have become the dominant pedagogical philosophy in schools of education.  Biased accounts of American history, manipulative “emotional learning,” collectivism over individual accomplishment, and enforced “diversity,” “sustainability,” and “social justice” lessons are the fruits of the teacher-training revolution led by Bill Ayers.  Especially harmed are the children who would benefit from traditional education the most: lower-income children.  

Tina Trent will discuss the impact of political radicals on the women’s studies movement.  Former terrorists including Bernardine Dohrn, Angela Davis, Susan Rosenberg, and Kathy Boudin saw an opportunity to reinvent themselves as victims of “the patriarchy” through feminism. The embrace of left-wing political activism by women’s studies departments resulted in a radical pedagogy that is anti-law enforcement and opposed to other feminist activists’ efforts to address violent crimes against women through traditional channels. The influence of this political radicalism can also be seen in the movement to create campus-based tribunals where students are tried and convicted for sex crimes without recourse to the real justice system.       

This lecture is made possible through the generosity of the The Devereaux F. and Dorothy M. McClatchey Foundation, and is sponsored by the Georgia Chapter, The National Association of Scholars. 

The lecture is free and open to the public.  Drinks and refreshments will be served. Free parking is available in the parking lot and on the street.  Handicapped accessible. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Ann Hartle ([email protected])

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